American Toddlers and Infants Are Eating More Sugar, Study Finds

American Toddlers and Infants Are Eating More Sugar, Study Finds

Health

Kids mostly like to munch on sweets, chocolates, sugary products, etc. But is it really safe to consume a massive amount of sugars in such a small age? A new trial of national data, published on Wednesday, shows 98% of toddlers and two-thirds of infants eat added sugar in their diets every day. It seems like parents in the U.S. are now offering more sugar to their kids. Thus, health experts have warned regarding the high consumption of sweet products at childhood that could raise the risk of developing some diseases.

A new finding is published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The study has discovered that 60% of the infants up to 11 months old, and 98% of toddlers between ages 12-23 months were vulnerable to excessive added sugars from food products between 2011 and 2016. During the trial, both teams were offered sweeteners higher than the recommended levels of nutritionists. Kristen Herrick, leading author of the test, said the consumption of added sugars among children has a relationship with adverse health conditions like cavities, high blood pressure, asthma, and altered lipid profiles.

For now, the researchers have not analyzed whether the same associations are present for younger children or not. Kristen added, the goal of the study was to focus on one aspect of diet, i.e., added sugars and its consumption among US infants and toddlers. Notably, infants aging between 6-11 months were typically served added sugars through flavored yogurt, baby snacks, and sweet bakery items. The study has not estimated any sugars present in infant formulas or breast milk. For toddlers ranging 12-23 months of age have consumed candy, sweet baked products, as well as fruit drinks. Even more, the study includes data from a nationally representative study carried out by the US CDC – the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Kristen said they have discovered that eating patterns recognized in the early phase of life shape later eating patterns.