Eating Dinner After 6 p.m. Might Raise Risk of Heart Disease, Experts Warn

Eating Dinner After 6 p.m. Might Raise Risk of Heart Disease, Experts Warn

Health

Rapidly transforming lifestyle has a massive impact on health, particularly on cardiovascular health. Sometimes we skip meals in a rush to go to the office or somewhere else, which might be harmful to health. Before this, many studies have revealed aspects of eating healthy food to have a healthier life. But a new one claims a surprising point, what matters here is the time. Yes, it is not about eating healthy; it is about eating on time. Scientists now say the time you eat may also play a vital role in living a healthy and long life.

A one-year trial has pinpointed women who eat food after 6 pm is at a higher risk of heart disease. Besides, those who have had late dinner had a higher risk of developing health conditions like excess BMI, high blood pressure, and uncontrolled blood sugar levels. Scientists from Columbia University, have studied more than 110 women during the trial. They say selecting to eat earlier in the evening could be an easy way to lessen the risk of having heart disease. Nour Makarem, an associate research scientist at the Columbia University Irving Medical Center, is the leading author of the study. Notably, when women and some men eat more at night, they are conflicting with their biorhythms.

As per Makarem, the human body has developed to take on a 24-hour day and night cycle. But the current work schedules have a higher demand. Besides, traveling to and from work presses every other thing to the later list. People often skip doing exercises or some other task to commute. Makarem noted now; they are also eating at odd times. Our brain consists of the master clock that manages the functioning of the body, including food digestion. Even organs have a clock which has a tie-up with the master clock. But when there happens an imbalance between both watches, it results in a condition of metabolic dysfunction. As a result, it may raise the risk of cardiovascular disease.