Microsoft Japan Experimented Four Day Workweek Which Boosted Productivity by 40%

Microsoft Japan Experimented Four Day Workweek Which Boosted Productivity by 40%

Business

A Microsoft Japan experiment into enhancing work-life balance has resulted in the rise of productivity by 40% after giving a four-day working week. All full-time employees were permitted to have Fridays off in August. Notably, the three-day weekend offs were paid ones. During the trial, Microsoft had pushed employees to shorten meetings up to 30 minutes. Even more, they were asked to opt for chatting over an internal network in order to cut down travel time. As a result, the tech giant has experienced a massive rise in productivity, along with cost reduction. Yes, Microsoft Japan has saved money during the experiment by minimizing electricity consumption by 23%. Even more, it has reduced printed paper by 59%. Both numbers were less as compared to the figures for August 2018.

The one-month trial has revealed 92% of employees were delighted with the four-day week. Now the company has planned for a similar experiment for winter, which will offer greater flexibility to workers and encourage them. On the other hand, the company has reported that some workers are concerned about the four-day week. They say the effort will discomfort customers if implemented at large-scale. Above all, the results of the trial play a crucial role in Japan. Recently, the country has tried to limit its culture of long working hours. In Japan, if a person dies due to overworking, they call it as Karoshi. Shinzo Abe, the country’s prime minister, has proposed a new law earlier this year to carb legal overtime work to 45 hours a month and 360 hours a year.

Thus Microsoft has tried to solve the problem liable for Karoshi, particularly for the Japanese workforce. It is the first largest company to offer a three-day weekend off. But it is not the first company to attempt with various policies that encourage people to work less. Other Japanese companies and even Japanese universities and federal agencies have schemes that pay employees to take vacations. But none of these policies have gone so far to close offices completely. But Microsoft has achieved the fleet, as the implementation has increased by almost 40% sales per employee.