CDC Warns About Multistate Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Ground Beef

CDC Warns About Multistate Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Ground Beef

Health

On Saturday, federal health officials have announced a multi-state Salmonella epidemic surmised to have links with ground beef. According to the reports of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 10 cases have been diagnosed. Even more, one patient has died due to the food-borne illness in California. Even more, eight others are admitted to the hospital. Notably, other cases belong to Texas, Kansas, Oklahoma, Colorado, and Iowa. Trials conducted by the CDC have revealed that ground beef is probably the origin of the epidemic. Although, the federal agency has not indicted a particular or common supplier of ground beef.

So far, there are ten cases from various states in the current outbreak, and it may be more severe than other cases of Salmonella. The patients belong to the age group of 48-74, and 80% of the victims are male. They have become sick between August 8 – September 22. The CDC said of nine ill people with information available eight, i.e., 89% are in the hospital. As per the agency, the number is much higher than the expectation. Meanwhile, CDC officials say usually only 20% of infection cases lead to hospitalization. Thus the health agency has warned that more cases may emerge in the upcoming days because it takes 2-4 weeks for the bacteria to exhibit.

Officials have found infected ground beef, in a repacked form, from one the person’s home who has passed away. Whereas, other patients have reported eating various and different types and brands of ground beef. As per the CDC officials, Salmonella leads to around 1.2 million illnesses and 450 deaths in the U.S. every year. Diarrhea, fever, and cramps in the stomach are some of the common symptoms of salmonella, which usually occur after 12-72 hours of being exposed to the bacteria. The infection commonly lasts for four days to a week. According to the CDC, children below five years of age, and older adults are more vulnerable to food-borne illness. For now, the CDC and FDA have partnered with other public health agencies to launch an investigation into the multi-state epidemic.