NASA’s Hubble Telescope Has Spotted a Creepy Face in Space

NASA’s Hubble Telescope Has Spotted a Creepy Face in Space

Science

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has spotted a spooky face in deep space. The American space agency has published a picture of which focuses on the collision of two galaxies into each other. Notably, the celestial bodies are around 704 miles away from the Earth. The ring of intense star formation has taken the shape of nose and face features, and the glowing eyes are the two galaxies. This ring will last up to 100 million years, and the galaxies will eventually merge into each other. Besides, the merging process may require one to two billion years.

Hubble telescope had captured the latest offering in June 2019. As per astronomers, it is the cosmic melee as the Arp-Madore 2026-424. Merging of galaxies can be commonly seen throughout the universe. The event of ring galaxies is extremely rare, and a very few hundred have ever happened in our cosmic neighborhood. For this to happen, the galaxies have to collide in just the right way for a ring to form. Although galaxy collisions are frequent, most are not like the ones that created this ghost-like face. The crash pulled and stretched the galaxies’ discs of gas, dust, and stars outward, forming the ring of intense star formation that shapes the nose and face features of the system. According to the ESA, the side-by-side juxtaposition of the two central bulges of stars from the galaxies is also a rare case.

As noted above, the view captured by Hubble is probably the result of a head-on merger between two galaxies. Scientists surmise both had an equal size. Even more, they have focused on the unique Arp0-Madore system as a part of Hubble’s snapshot program. The scheme uses rare time periods between scientific observations to capture incredible Astro imagery of galaxies behaving in strange ways. Apart from this, astronomers anticipate creating a catalog of these images that will assist them in understanding the evolution of galaxies through violent galactic collisions. It will also offer tantalizing targets for future missions like James Webb Space Telescope. Even more, a zoomable version of the image is available on the official website of Hubble Space Telescope.