San Diego Scientists Say Millions of People Are Searching CBD Online

San Diego Scientists Say Millions of People Are Searching CBD Online

Health

People are becoming more curious to know about CBD; the number is increasing day by day. The latest study has revealed the surprising fact. According to research unveiled Wednesday, Google search rates for the non-intoxicating cannabis derivative are heightening at massive rates. Looking at the number of people typed in “CBD” or the chemical’s full name, “cannabidiol,” the University of California, San Diego, and Johns Hopkins University researchers found triple-fold rate increases during recent years. The research says search rates grew 126% between 2016 and 2017, then another 160% from 2017 to 2018. Even more, people are expected to search for CBD and cannabidiol 117.7% more in the current year than 2018.

Trendy CBD – short for cannabidiol – oils, edibles, and other products have taken the US by storm as the marijuana derivative as legalization has spread to 33 states for medical purposes and 11 for recreational use. It’s sold in medical centers, pharmacies, and entire cafes have emerged to peddle CBD. Besides, they are advertising it for everything from anxiety to acne and menstrual cramps. But in reality, its only proven and FDA-approved use is to seizures, argue the study authors who compare the product to ‘snake oil.’

Study’s co-author Dr. John Ayers, the Vice Chief of Innovation in the Division of Infectious Disease and Global Public Health at UC San Diego, said CBD has become insanely popular. He added, three years ago, there was mostly no one searching about CBD online, but now there are an estimated 6.4 million unique searches each month. According to the researchers, CBD is legally allowed, but scientifically unestablished. Although its broadly viewed as harmless, some patients have sought out CBD as not just a complement to but substitute for proven treatments of life-threatening diseases, including cancer, a pattern that has experts deeply concerned. Dr. Davey Smith, a physician and Chief of Infectious Diseases and Global Public Health at UC San Diego, said some consumers might forgo seeing a physician or taking medications with known, tested, and approved therapeutic benefits in favor of CBD and thereby become sicker or give up to their illness. Dr. Ayers said, now, it is the time to act.